Build Your Own Home Server: Storing A Large Amount Of Multimedia Files

Why would you need a network attached storage (NAS) server at home?

  • Automatic backup of smartphone data
  • Manage and share data on the Internet
  • Stream saved videos
  • Download and manage Torrents on a smartphone
  • Host a personal blog
  • Enable SSL for security

Required components:

  • Internet service
  • A WiFi router
  • A typical computer or a laptop, such as a MacBook Pro
  • ODROID-HC1 and its power supply
  • MicroSD card for the operating system
  • LAN cable to connect between WiFi router and ODROID-HC1
  • Hard Disk Drive (2.5inch) for my multimedia data
ODroid Figure 1 - Home server using ODROID-HC1
Figure 1 – Home server using ODROID-HC1

You also need a little bit of understanding of the operating system as well as Open Media Vault (www.openmediavault.org), which will allow everyone to install and administrate a Network Attached Storage without deeper knowledge.

Preparation
First, download Open Media Vault (OMV) for ODROID-HC1 from http://bit.ly/2xogExP to your computer. Refer to the readme.txt file for the username and password.

web interface username = admin
web interface password = openmediavault

console/ssh username = root
console/ssh password (3.0.75+) = openmediavault

ODROID Figure 2 - Downloaded Open Media Vault image
Figure 2 – Downloaded Open Media Vault image

Next, use a USB adapter with an 8GB microSD card, then open Etcher (etcher.io) to flash the operating system, as shown in Figure 3. Make sure to unzip the .7z file before selecting it in Etcher.

ODROID Figure 3 - Inserting the USB adapter and microSD card in the computer
Figure 3 – Inserting the USB adapter and microSD card in the computer
ODROID Figure 4 - The unzipped image file has a different filename than the .7z file
Figure 4 – The unzipped image file has a different filename than the .7z file
ODROID Figure 5 - Etcher allows you to write pre-built images to a microSD card
Figure 5 – Etcher allows you to write pre-built images to a microSD card

General configuration
Insert the completed Open Media Vault image into the ODROID-HC1, then slide and insert the hard disk drive to the SATA connector. Connect the LAN cable from the WiFi router to HC1 and plug the power supply to turn it on. It will take approximately 10 minutes for the first boot. With another LAN cable, connect the computer to the same WiFi router which is connected to the HC1.

Next, download and install Angry IP Scanner (http://bit.ly/2wCMeII) and scan the IP addresses of the connected devices. The Hostname is shown as odroidxu4.local. Open a browser and enter the ODROID-HC1 address.

ODROID Figure 6 - Scanning the local IP addresses to locate the IP address of the ODROID-HC1
Figure 6 – Scanning the local IP addresses to locate the IP address of the ODROID-HC1
ODROID Figure 7 - Logging into the web interface of Open Media Vault
Figure 7 – Logging into the web interface of Open Media Vault

As mentioned above, the default username and password is in the readme.txt at http://bit.ly/2xogExP.

web interface username = admin
web interface password = openmediavault

ODROID Figure 8 - Home screen of the Open Media Vault web interface
Figure 8 – Home screen of the Open Media Vault web interface

Go to “System -> Date & Time” and change the timezone to your current location, then press “Activate [Use NTP server] -> Save -> Apply”.

ODROID Figure 9 - Updating the date and time in Open Media Vault
Figure 9 – Updating the date and time in Open Media Vault

You can also change the session timeout to “0” in order not to be logged out after a certain amount of idle time by selecting “General Settings -> Session timeout -> 0 -> Save -> Apply -> Yes”.

ODROID Figure 10 - Saving the configuration changes in Open Media Vault
Figure 10 – Saving the configuration changes in Open Media Vault

Next, update the system to the latest version by selecting “Update Management -> Check Package information -> Upgrade”, reload the page after the update completes, then reboot the ODROID-HC1 using the “Reboot” option in the Open Media Vault web interface.

ODROID Figure 11 - Updating to the latest version of Open Media Vault
Figure 11 – Updating to the latest version of Open Media Vault
ODROID Figure 12 - The Open Media Vault update has been completed
Figure 12 – The Open Media Vault update has been completed
ODROID Figure 13 - The page should be reloaded after the Open Media Vault update completes
Figure 13 – The page should be reloaded after the Open Media Vault update completes
ODROID Figure 14 - Select “Reboot” from the Open Media Vault web interface
Figure 14 – Select “Reboot” from the Open Media Vault web interface
ODROID Figure 15 and 16 - Ignore the error messages after pressing “Reboot”
Figure 15 and 16 – Ignore the error messages after pressing “Reboot”

ODROID Figure 15 and 16 - Ignore the error messages after pressing “Reboot”

ODROID Figure 17 - Login to the Open Media Vault web interface after the reboot has completed
Figure 17 – Login to the Open Media Vault web interface after the reboot has completed

Setting permissions
The hard drive needs to be in ext4 format in order to be compatible with Open Media Vault. If the file system of the hard drive is not ext4, you will need to create a new file system, as shown in Figure 17)

ODROID Figures 18 - 24 - Formatting the hard drive to ext4 format
Figures 18 – 24 – Formatting the hard drive to ext4 format

ODROID Figures 18 - 24 - Formatting the hard drive to ext4 format

ODROID Figures 18 - 24 - Formatting the hard drive to ext4 format

ODROID Figures 18 - 24 - Formatting the hard drive to ext4 format

ODROID Figures 18 - 24 - Formatting the hard drive to ext4 format

ODROID Figures 18 - 24 - Formatting the hard drive to ext4 format

ODROID Figures 18 - 24 - Formatting the hard drive to ext4 format

After the format has completed, select “Mount” as shown in Figures 19 and 20.

ODROID Figures 25, 26 and 27 - Mounting the newly formatted hard drive
Figures 25, 26 and 27 – Mounting the newly formatted hard drive

ODROID Figures 25, 26 and 27 - Mounting the newly formatted hard drive

ODROID Figures 25, 26 and 27 - Mounting the newly formatted hard drive

The next step is to register users who have permissions to transfer data to/from the server.

ODROID Figures 28 and 29 - Registering the “odroid” user to be able to transfer data to/from the server
Figures 28 and 29 – Registering the “odroid” user to be able to transfer data to/from the server

ODROID Figures 28 and 29 - Registering the “odroid” user to be able to transfer data to/from the server

After the user has been created, create a shared folder by selecting “Shared Folders -> Add -> Name -> Select Device -> Set Permissions -> Save”. Each user then needs to be granted privileges. Grant the user “odroid” shared read/write folder privileges and save the settings.

ODROID Figures 30 and 31 - Creating the shared folder and assigning individual user privileges
Figures 30 and 31 – Creating the shared folder and assigning individual user privileges

ODROID Figures 30 and 31 - Creating the shared folder and assigning individual user privileges

ACL is another type of permission that needs to be granted, as described at http://bit.ly/2xn98sb. The user “odroid” needs read/write/execute permissions, and other users can be given permissions as needed.

ODROID Figure 32 - Giving ACL permissions to the “odroid” user
Figure 32 – Giving ACL permissions to the “odroid” user

Data transfer using Samba
The server can be shared with the workgroup using Samba (SMB). Click “Apply” to see the shared folder.

ODROID Figures 33, 34 and 35 - Sharing the server using Samba
Figures 33, 34 and 35 – Sharing the server using Samba

ODROID Figures 33, 34 and 35 - Sharing the server using Samba

ODROID Figures 33, 34 and 35 - Sharing the server using Samba

Note that if you have two or more of the same shared devices or folders, your computer may rename one for you. For example, if you have two ODROID-HC1s attached to the router, it will recognize the first as odroidxu4 and name the second one, odroidxu4–2, to differentiate the two. If you do not see the two automatically, try rebooting your computer.

ODROID Figure 36 - Accessing the shared folder from a networked computer
Figure 36 – Accessing the shared folder from a networked computer

Open Finder and check “Shared” to see the odroidxu4 shared server, which is the ODROID-HC1. Click “Connect As” and enter the name and password which matches the username and password that was created on the server. After connecting, files and folders can be transferred to and from the ODROID-HC1 server.

ODROID Figure 37 - Copying files and folders to the ODROID-HC1 using Samba
Figure 37 – Copying files and folders to the ODROID-HC1 using Samba

Data transfer using FTP
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a standard network protocol used for the transfer of coputer files between a client and server on a computer network. First, enable FTP on Open Media Vault as shown in Figure 38.

ODROID Figure 38 - Enabling FTP in Open Media Vault
Figure 38 – Enabling FTP in Open Media Vault

Next, enable the shared folder by selecting “Services -> FTP -> Shares -> Add -> Enable -> select Shared folder -> Save”.

ODROID Figure 39 - Selecting the shared FTP folder in Open Media Vault
Figure 39 – Selecting the shared FTP folder in Open Media Vault

After FTP is enabled, files can be transferred to/from the server by visiting ftp://192.168.0.111 in a browser, using the address of the ODROID-HC1 server in place of 192.168.0.111.

ODROID Figures 40 and 41 - Visiting the Open Media Vault server via FTP using Firefox
Figures 40 and 41 – Visiting the Open Media Vault server via FTP using Firefox

ODROID Figures 40 and 41 - Visiting the Open Media Vault server via FTP using Firefox

ODROID Figure 42 - Visiting the Open Media Vault server via FTP using Chrome
Figure 42 – Visiting the Open Media Vault server via FTP using Chrome

Next, install FTP on your smartphone, using an app such as FTP Sprite for iPhone, or ES File Explorer for Android.

ODROID Figures 43 and 44 - Accessing the Open Media Vault server using FTP on a smartphone
Figures 43 and 44 – Accessing the Open Media Vault server using FTP on a smartphone

ODROID Figures 43 and 44 - Accessing the Open Media Vault server using FTP on a smartphone

Shutdown
On your Open Media Vault web interface, below the banner, click the three vertical dots on the right, and select “Shutdown”.

ODROID Figures 45 and 46 - Shutting down the server via the Open Media Vault menu
Figures 45 and 46 – Shutting down the server via the Open Media Vault menu

ODROID Figures 45 and 46 - Shutting down the server via the Open Media Vault menu

When the screen shown in Figure 47 appears, your operating system has stopped running, and the blue blinking LED should be off on the ODROID-HC1. A this point, you can unplug the power supply and remove the microSD card. Follow this shutdown procedure anytime you need to change the hard drive, update the operating system on the microSD card, or unplug the power. This will help avoid damaging the ODROID-HC1.

ODROID Figure 47 - Post-shutdown screen in Open Media Vault
Figure 47 – Post-shutdown screen in Open Media Vault

For comments, questions, or suggestions, please visit the original article at https://medium.com/p/6a3771d9172.

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